Why Do We Do Chores in Video Games?

We whine about doing chores, yet we enjoy tending to our gardens in video games. Why is that?

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7 Comments

Filed under Video Game Misc., Video Games: Reader Q&A

7 responses to “Why Do We Do Chores in Video Games?

  1. Actually, I have transferred all my gaming skills to the real world. As a result, my job performance improved.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. What do you think?
    Games are (usually) voluntary; work and chores aren’t. Games also tend to provide predictable rewards, as they tend to be designed in ways that keep people coming back. Jobs, etc. tend to have quite a bit of unfairness in them, as they weren’t really designed to be fair or fun, but to make business owners/shareholders more money. That is IF a jobs was designed at all for the actual people who do them. Ian Bogost would say that it is because we aren’t treating chores/tasks seriously enough, that they aren’t fun. His video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=78rPt0RsosQ

    Liked by 1 person

  3. For XP so we can advance the plot? For the happy little chime when we do something well? Hm, I think you just gave me an idea for a post… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. When tending my garden gives me rupees, then I’ll enjoy IRL chores 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. We get rewarded for doing chores in video games (most of the time) so there is more incentive to complete them. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  6. This isn’t always true. I hear that a lot of people moaned about the chores in No More Heroes.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I love thinking about this stuff. Most games, in essence, are chores. We’re given responsibilities and rules and must complete a task.
    I think we like games and even chores in games because they help us develop important skills we intuitively want to practice. We want to flex our mental resilience in difficult games, we want a chance to dispel our stress from real life chores, and I’ve even seen an interesting “chore game” (in the middle of the revolutionary The Beginners Guide) that seemed to be created as a chore simulator for the unique purpose of recreating that pleasant feeling of completing chores for a loved one. It helps us practice mindfulness and appreciation of tasks that we otherwise scorn or ignore.
    Now, if only we could remember that appreciation when we’re not playing……..

    Liked by 1 person

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